We had a class CommunITP feast on Wed (the day before Thanksgiving) and discussed the fourth section of Michael Pollan’s The Botany of Desire, all about the potato and the control we want to exercise over it.

Scott won the rock-paper-scissors contest at the end of class, winning a… potato gun.

We had a class CommunITP feast on Wed (the day before Thanksgiving) and discussed the fourth section of Michael Pollan’s The Botany of Desire, all about the potato and the control we want to exercise over it.

Scott won the rock-paper-scissors contest at the end of class, winning a… potato gun.

After reading The fourth chapter “The Potato” and the epilogue of The Botany of Desire, there are two ideas that come to my mind:
First, as in the constant struggle of man trying to control —or domesticate— nature, I tried to make an analogy with communities. One could look at man as the moderator of a given community and nature as the community itself. While the creator or moderator can have some control of it, s/he can never force it to do something that is not in their nature. Great knowledge and wisdom are required to cultivate and grow it stronger. And any forced action risks the destruction of the community. Plus, it requires constant attention to maintain it healthy and organized, since it can go wild quite fast, becoming really hard to bring it back to what it was before. It made me remember our talk with the community manager of foursquare. She told us the everyday work with the community, day and night , and how she was very careful to take care of the situations as they appeared, as fast as possible, to avoid having them out of control.
Secondly, I’m seriously thinking of stop buying food in my local supermarket, and look for an organic farmer’s market to get my fruits vegetables. I already knew it wasn’t very healthy, but now I have a clearer picture of what’s happening. It’s just so easy to go to the supermarket, with longer opening hours and everything in one place. We’ll see.

After reading The fourth chapter “The Potato” and the epilogue of The Botany of Desire, there are two ideas that come to my mind:

First, as in the constant struggle of man trying to control —or domesticate— nature, I tried to make an analogy with communities. One could look at man as the moderator of a given community and nature as the community itself. While the creator or moderator can have some control of it, s/he can never force it to do something that is not in their nature. Great knowledge and wisdom are required to cultivate and grow it stronger. And any forced action risks the destruction of the community. Plus, it requires constant attention to maintain it healthy and organized, since it can go wild quite fast, becoming really hard to bring it back to what it was before.
It made me remember our talk with the community manager of foursquare. She told us the everyday work with the community, day and night , and how she was very careful to take care of the situations as they appeared, as fast as possible, to avoid having them out of control.

Secondly, I’m seriously thinking of stop buying food in my local supermarket, and look for an organic farmer’s market to get my fruits vegetables.
I already knew it wasn’t very healthy, but now I have a clearer picture of what’s happening. It’s just so easy to go to the supermarket, with longer opening hours and everything in one place. We’ll see.